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This lesson demonstrates a sample exercise from Patrick Marsepoil's latest ebook, 8th Note Jailbreak and some applications for around the kit.
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This lesson shares some good sounding drum beats and fills designed to keep beginner to intermediate level drummers motivated (and sounding cool).
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The guitar riff from Smoke on the Water seems to get all of the attention. Well, not it in this lesson. We're going to focus on the classic fill that leads into the first chorus of the song. Of course, we'll also look at some variations and ways to use this fill with our own beats.
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This lesson focuses on playing the hi-hat with both the stick and the foot pedal at the same time, a technique that Chad Smith often uses. The grooves in this lesson use this technique to make accenting the "Es" and "Ahs" with the open hi-hat very easy.
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Putting a strong emphasis on the syncopated strokes (i.e. the “E” and “Ah”) in a drum fill gives the fill a … well, more syncopated feel. Beyond that, it makes the groove sound more complex and difficult than it actually is. That reason alone, however, shouldn't be why you choose to play a syncopated fill. Syncopation feels energetic, funky and naturally makes people want to move. If this is the feel you need to present in a song, try some “E's” and “Ah's.”
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You may not be familiar with the technical term half-time, but you probably have already recognized the unique feel of a half-time groove. Think of the songs Fool in the Rain – Led Zeppelin, Rosanna – Toto, and even more modern songs like Toxicity – System of a Down or The Phoenix – Fall Out Boy. They all use the half-time groove at some point within the song (or throughout the entire song).
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Borrowing from the classic and instantly recognizable intro groove from Walk The Way by Aerosmith, this lesson focuses on the concept of playing the open hi-hat on beat 1 of the groove.
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Backbeats have a strong influence on the feel of your grooves. They can make your groove sound energetic, up, down, off, on, etc. This lesson explores different backbeat arrangements all based on the same foundational groove. This way, you'll be able to examine how each backbeat influences the feel of the groove in its own unique way.
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This week's lesson examines the main chorus groove and fill from Shut Up and Dance by Walk The Moon. This sixteenth note groove uses the open hi-hat to accent the up-beat, bringing a feel to the groove that makes you want to dance.
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Moving your right stick to the snare instead of the hi-hat can produce a unique sounding groove. You can further develop the groove by moving the right stick back and forth around the toms.
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The flam accent can make for some interestingly cool drum fills when you move it around the kit. This lesson explores some fun fills based on the flam accent.
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This lesson outlines the '70s classic hit by Yes. Drummer Bill Bruford brings a unique flavor to this piece, cutting the intro's fast rock groove in half phrasing his back-beat in groups of 5. Not many of us would have even thought to do something like this, and even fewer could make it actually work.
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This week, we're running through some sample techniques from Andy Ziker's latest ebook, Funk Up Your Ride.
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This week, we'll be taking a look at the main groove and fills from the pre-chorus of Come As You Are by Nirvana. This drumming style paved the way for grunge rockers and beyond.
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This lesson takes a step back to examine the grooves we play, breaking down and discussing two of the most used patterns in drumming. Being able to recognize and play these patterns will help you to grasp new grooves more quickly.

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