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nthomas33

Help with adjusting PDP double bass pedal

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So, I just got this PDP double bass pedal the other day at guitar center. It was a cheap, used one, I didn't want to spend too much on it since I wanted to learn it before I shell out the cash for a nice one, but anyways, it's too heavy for my puny legs, but I am tinkering with the springs to get it to the stiffness I want, but my problem is that no matter how I set the springs, the strikers always spring waaay far back, like touching my feet, and so far I've basically took the whole thing apart and can't figure out for the life of me how to adjust that, of if you can even adjust that. So uhh, little help? heh.

Also, I practice on a Yamaha DTXplorer, because A) there's not really room for an acoustic setup at my house, and B) My mom works night shift, so she's sleeping a lot, so is there a kick pad made for double bass pedals, or like an attachment?

One last thing, any recommendations on a hi-hat clutch for when I do play on my acoustic?

Thanks for the help,

Nick

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Congrats on the new pedal!  Tweaking a pedal is definitely time consuming, and depending on the pedal, it may be impossible to find a setting you want.  The higher end pedals have a lot of adjustments, while the lower end pedals don't.

With that said, I'm not familiar with the pedal you have, but often there is an adjustment that allows you to move the beater forward and back so that you can control how far it will return after striking the bass.

Since you've taken yours all apart, I'm assuming it doesn't have one.  If this is the case, the only option you have is loosening the springs.  This should help with the "heavy" feeling, too.

Anyone else have any advice for this pedal?

If you figure something out, please let us know.  I'm sure this will be helpful to a lot of other people in your situation down the road.

Good topic!

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I don't have any other advice. Since I don't have that pedal my only thought is loosen the nut that holds the spring in place.  Taking some tension out of it.  I had a Single pedal years ago that would snap back real hard.. I had a NASTY bruise on the top of my foot because of it.

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Solution. I removed the batter... put the rod in a vice... bent it up to about a 35-40 degree angle. No more hitting my instep. :)

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I suppose that would be similar to rotating the beater closer on the shaft and would actually work somewhat.

My beaters are 5.5"(14cm)  from the head. Everyone wants it different and so adjustability is important.

I had the exact same problem 10 years or more ago when I re-entered drums after tons of years off.

Leg strength will come over time and you'll get to the point where your foot contacting the pedal at all times will control the bounce and not only not hit your shin but help you enter the next stroke. Seat height makes a huge difference. Try up and down.

For price and usability a used set of Iron Cobras has full adjustability for around $200 or less. A single ic can be $100 but are rare.

I would actually recommend just one for learning but that never happens. I admire any drummer who isn't scared to put their left foot on a hi hat and use that to keep the pulse. Free up the bass. That's just me. But it's not. Check out some of the really proficient drummers doing a solo. Often the hi hat is keeping the pulse. It gives a visual indicator for the beat to other musicians as a bonus. Just try it, for fun (all you rockers), You may never look back. Left foot ,2,3,4, go.

That was a cool solution Bubba and one I would have done myself in a heartbeat to get me by for a while. Keep at 'er.

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